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History

Following the legacy of its namesake, Joffre Lanning Coe, CFAR has supported numerous programs that have made a significant difference in the consideration of archaeology in North Carolina.

CFAR arose from the suggestion of Joffre Coe to create an organization that would allow development of a public constituency to actively support archaeological programs in North Carolina. CFAR is not an archaeological society, nor was it intended to be. It is a foundation that acts to support archaeology.

Through the contributions of our many dedicated volunteers, CFAR has provided assistance to many organizations in the form of volunteer service, technical guidance, financial grants, and equipment donations. Since 1989, CFAR members have contributed thousands of hours of volunteer work to projects throughout the state. These projects have included field work under the supervision of professional archaeologists, publications, workshops and exhibits.

In CFAR's early years, a majority of the membership lived near Asheboro, N.C. These dedicated people hungered for more meaningful knowledge about the prehistoric cultures of the region. Many were amateur archaeologists or relic collectors; others were teachers, lawyers, law enforcement officials, and business people. They shared a curiosity about the ancient past and wanted to involve themselves in historic preservation efforts.

The central Piedmont region has a rich legacy related to the historical development on archaeology in North Carolina. In 1936, along the floodplain of Caraway Creek in Randolph County, the Archaeological Society of North Carolina implemented the first scientific archaeological study in North Carolina at the Keyauwee site. It was directed by 20-year-old Joffre Lanning Coe, a Greensboro native, who as a teenager had volunteered on archaeological projects in several states.

From this beginning, many hundreds of people have become volunteers to promote, preserve and enhance archaeological knowledge in North Carolina.





The Coe Foundation for Archaeological Research, Inc.
Post Office Box 25311
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611-5311
www.coe-foundation.org